Cherokee…Did You Know?

By  | August 5, 2018 | Filed under: Interesting Facts, News

NOTE:  Alabama celebrates her bicentennial this year.  QCDNews presents Interesting Facts about some of North Alabama’s cities.

The earliest white settlers of what is now Cherokee area called the community Buzzard Roost. Population increases by 1838 spurred construction of more roads to the area. The area remained primarily agricultural. The first post office opened in 1856, and the U.S. Postal Service gave it the name Cherokee. In 1857 the Memphis and Charleston Railroad came through the area. A depot built in 1858-1859 to serve a new rail line through the town prompted a building boom, and lots laid out around the depot sold quickly. By 1862, the town had grown enough that the citizens voted to incorporate, officially adopting the name of the post office.

Primarily because of its location on a railroad line, the town became a strategic target during the Civil War. Union Forces occupied the town three times. The town suffered badly economically during Reconstruction but recovered and continued to expand. By the early 1900s, the town had numerous stores, a grist mill, and a hotel. The first telephone system was installed in 1914.

Each July, Cherokee celebrates Independence Day with an annual Cherokee 4th of July Street Dance. The Key Underwood Coon Dog Memorial Graveyard, just outside Cherokee, is a cemetery devoted to coonhound breeds. Barton Hall (ca. 1825) is a National Historic Landmark and is located just off the historic Natchez Trace Parkway, which runs past Cherokee, as is the Buzzard Roost Spring, the site of an inn owned by Chickasaw leader Levi Colbert between 1800 and 1824.
The Hodge-Blackburn-Twitty House (c. 1844) is on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage. Barton Hall and Buzzard Roost are on the National Register of Historic Places.

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